Friday, October 16, 2020

V 10 N. 72 Remembering Charlie Moore Olympic Gold 1952 400IH R.I.P.

Walt Murphy brought this news to our attention on his blog This Day in Track and Field.
The notes below are from Olympedia. Charlie Moore Biographical information Medals OG Gold 1 Silver 1 Bronze 0 Total 2 Type Competed in Olympic Games Sex Male Full name Charles Hewes "Charlie"•Moore, Jr. Used name Charlie•Moore Born 12 August 1929 in Coatesville, Pennsylvania (USA) Died 8 October 2020 in Laporte, Pennsylvania (USA) Measurements 185 cm / 77 kg Affiliations NYAC, New York (USA) NOC(s) United States Biography As a high hurdler, Charles “Crip” Moore, Sr. went to Paris in 1924 as an alternate on the Olympic team. In 1952, 28 years later, his son, Charlie Moore, Jr. enjoyed far greater success at the Olympics when he won the 400m hurdles and ran a 46.3 relay leg for the team that took the silver medals behind Jamaica. After prepping at Mercersburg Academy, Moore won the NCAA 440y flat for Cornell in 1949 and the 220y low hurdles in 1951. He won the AAU 440y hurdles four years straight from 1949 and was unbeaten in his 23 races as an intermediate hurdler. After the 1952 Olympics, at meets in London, he twice posted a world record for the 440y hurdles within the space of five days, leaving it at 51.6. Moore finished second in the balloting for the Sullivan Award in 1952. He was world ranked #1 in the 400 hurdles in 1949, 1951, and 1952, and was in the top 10 of the open 400 three times, ranking #5 in 1949 and 1951. Moore went into the business world and became managing director of Peers & Co., an investment banking firm, and was then CEO of Peers Management Resources, in management consulting. He then served as vice-president of Advisory Capital Partners, an investment advising company. Moore was athletic director at Cornell from 1994-99 and served as president of the Intercollegiate Association of Amateur Athletics of America (IC4A) starting in 1999. He was later Chairman of the Institute for Sustainable Value Creation, serving as executive director of the Committee Encouraging Corporate Philanthropy (CECP) from the organization’s founding in 1999 through 2013. In 2008, CR (Corporate Responsibility) Magazine recognized him as the Non-Profit & NGO CEO of the Year and gave him its Lifetime Achievement in Philanthropy award in 2013. Personal Bests: 400 – 46.7y (1949); 400H – 50.7 (1952). Results Games Discipline (Sport) Event Status Team Pos Details 1952 Summer Olympics Athletics 400 metres Hurdles, Men Olympic 1 Gold Representing United States 4 × 400 metres Relay, Men Olympic United States 2 Silver Olympic Records Records may have been broken subsequently during the same competition. Games Date Sport Event Phase Mark Pos 1952 Summer Olympics 20 July 1952 Athletics 400 metres Hurdles, Men Quarter-Finals, Heat One 50.8 1 1952 Summer Olympics 21 July 1952 Athletics 400 metres Hurdles, Men Final 50.8 1 1952 Summer Olympics 26 July 1952 Athletics 4 × 400 metres Relay, Men Round One, Heat Two 3:11.67 1 _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ This report from Syracuse.com/sports Charlie Moore, 1952 Olympic gold medalist who went on to become athletic director at Cornell University, is shown at the school in 1996. By The Associated Press Charlie Moore, the 400-meter hurdles champion at the 1952 Helsinki Olympics, has died. He was 91. Moore died Thursday from pancreatic cancer, according to World Athletics. Cornell University also confirmed the passing of the school’s former athletic director and star athlete. Moore won the 400 hurdles in the rain in 1952 in 50.8 seconds to tie the Olympic record he set in the quarterfinals. Moore also earned a silver medal in Helsinki on the United States' 1,600-meter relay team. After the Olympics, he set a world record of 51.6 in the 440 hurdles at the British Empire Games in London. Charles Moore Jr. grew up in Pennsylvania and was a standout at Mercersburg Academy before going on to Cornell. He was inducted into Cornell’s Athletic Hall of Fame in 1978 and the USA Track and Field Hall in 1999. Moore donated his two Olympic medals to Mercersburg Academy. “I couldn’t figure out how you divide two medals among nine children,” Moore said in a recent interview posted on the United States Olympic & Paralympic Committee website. “Mercersburg gave me my start and they’ll be there for everybody to see, including my children.” Moore went on to become a successful business executive, investment fund manager, athletics administrator and later an author and philanthropist. His father, Charles “Crip” Moore Sr., was an alternate as a hurdler for the U.S. in the 1924 Paris Olympics. “My father was the one whose idea it was I should make the Olympic team. He was my best friend, also my mentor and also the guy who pushed the hell out of me,” Moore told the USOPC website. “I loved it. He’d say, ‘Charlie I want you do to this,’ and I would say, ‘Yes, sir.’” Moore helped pioneer a 13-step approach to the hurdles, which is used today. Kevin Young set the longstanding 400-meter hurdles record in 1992 with his time of 46.78 seconds. Information on services for Moore will be announced later.

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V 10 N. 72 Remembering Charlie Moore Olympic Gold 1952 400IH R.I.P.

Walt Murphy brought this news to our attention on his blog This Day in Track and Field. The notes below are from Olympedia....