Thursday, September 21, 2017

V 7 N. 66 Bernie Casey, national class hurdler R.I.P.

Bernie Casey, Bowling Green State University, national class hurdler in the late 1950s and early 1960s died this week as reported below in Variety.  Bernie won the Mid American Conference 120HH titles in 1958,59, and 60.   Casey competed in the 1960 Olympic Trials  where he finished sixth in 14.2.  He  then played flanker  with the San Francisco 49er for six years.  Bernie Casey followed football into the arts world, acting, writing, and directing in multiple films.  He was also an accomplished artist and published poet.

from Variety Sept. 21, 2017


Bernie Casey, the former NFL star known for his work in the films “Boxcar Bertha” and “Revenge of the Nerds,” died on Tuesday in Los Angeles after a brief illness, Variety has confirmed. He was 78.
Casey made his film debut in the 1969 sequel “Guns of the Magnificent Seven.” He then acted alongside fellow former NFL star Jim Brown in the crime dramas “…tick…tick…tick…” and “Black Gunn.” He played the title role in the 1972 science fiction TV film “Gargoyles,” and then portrayed Tamara Dobson’s love interest in 1973’s “Cleopatra Jones.”
With Burt Reynolds in Sharkey's Revenge



Casey wrote, directed, produced, and starred in “The Dinner,” a 1997 film centering on three black men who discuss slavery, black self-loathing, and homophobia. That same year, he loosely portrayed a version George Jackson, a member of the Black Panther Party who was killed, in the drama “Brothers.”
In Martin Scorsese’s “Boxcar Bertha,” he played a heroic former slave and train robber, and then a recurring character in Bond films, CIA agent Felix Leiter. In 1981, he portrayed a detective opposite another former NFL player-turned-actor, Burt Reynolds, in “Sharky’s Machine,” which was directed by Reynolds. The two worked together a few years later on “Rent-a-Cop.”
His prolific acting career also included films such as “Revenge of the Nerds,” “Black Chariot,” “The Man Who Fell to Earth,” “In the Mouth of Madness,” “The Glass Shield,” “Mr. Hyde,” “Once Upon a Time … When We Were Colored,” and “I’m Gonna Git You Sucka.” On television, he was in “Roots: The Next Generations,” “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine,” and “Bay City Blues.”
Casey was born in Wyco, W.Va., and raised in Columbus, Ohio, before attending Bowling Green State University on a football scholarship. There, in addition to his football successes, he was a record-breaking track and field athlete, and competed in the 1960 U.S. Olympic trials.
He was picked ninth overall in the NFL draft, and spent six seasons with the San Francisco 49ers before going to the Rams for two years. He retired at age 30 and finished his professional career with 359 catches for 5,444 yards and 40 touchdowns.
After leaving the NFL, he dabbled in acting, painting, and poetry. Casey received an honorary doctorate degree from the Savannah College of Art and Design. He advocated for arts education and served as chairman of the board at the Georgia school. Casey was both a published poet and painter, whose work appeared in galleries across the globe.

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

V7 N. 65 Martin Broomall Biles, Olympic Javelin Thrower R.I.P.

Martin Broomall Biles    passed away August 25, 2017 in Houston, TX..  Biles finished 6th in the javelin in the 1948 Olympics with a throw of 65 meters.   For many years he resided in Naples, FL and the following edited Obituary appeared in the Naples Daily News on Sept. 20, 2017.



NAPLES, FL

Martin passed peacefully on August 25, 2017 in Houston, Texas at the age of 98. He lived a long and rich life filled with personal satisfactions and achievements

He was born in San Diego, California on March 30, 1919 to Herbert Elmore and Anna Elizabeth (Broomall) Biles. He attended the University of California at Berkeley where he earned his BS and MS in Engineering, and after WWIIcontinued his studies to earn a Ph.D. in Nuclear Engineering at North Carolina State University.

At Cal he was a star athlete where he was the AAU javelin champion in 1943-44, after winning the NCAA javelin title in 1940-41. He represented the United States in the first post war Olympics held in London in 1948 in the Javelin event.

After being discharged from the Air Force with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel he worked for the Atomic Energy Commission until retirement in 1977 with the title of Director of Operational Safety. In this capacity he also served as Scientific Attaché with the US Embassies in Brussels and Paris.

He lived in Kensington, Md. for 40 years with his first wife, Francis Lee Kennedy and daughters before moving in 2001 to Naples with Lee who died in 2002.
An inurnment ceremony will be held at Arlington National Cemetery at a time to be determined.
Published in Naples Daily News on Sept. 20, 2017

V 7 N. 64 Coach Mark Arce Making Steady Improvement

Mark Arce,  Findlay University Head Track and Cross Country Coach has been making steady improvement according to his wife Lisa Klingshirn's reports (See Below).  He was hit by the side view mirror on a truck that passed close to him as he was riding a bicycle 25 miles to his team's cross country meet last weekend.  Don't ask me if he plans to do this again.

 The reports read from most recent at the top going further back to last Saturday when he was first injured.  Lisa writes these reports like a progress in interval training.  Each time he is going a little longer with breathing on his own.  Because of all his broken ribs (8) it is less painful to be on a ventilator, but they shut it off a little longer each time to let him breathe on his own.  Unfortunately they don't remove the tube in his throat, so he can't talk.   As things progress , we will add new reports on this posting.  Just check in periodically.  Both the men's and women's teams apparently made it to the meet without knowing of the accident.  They finished third in both meets.

Here is what Lisa has sent up to today, September 20, 2017.  Our apologies for the overlap on the right side of the column.  At the bottom it sounds pretty grim, but it appears to keep getting better although not fast enough.  George Brose




Wednesday, September 20, 2017
Today started with another breathing session – 4 ½ hours (small PR!); however
 still waiting for breathing tube to come out.  He had been running a fever and
culture results confirmed an infection.  They are now treating him with a more 
specific antibiotic so that should help.  He would need to be able to forcefully cough 
if the tube was out and they need to make sure he is strong enough to do that.  He 
got a bit of “food” today through a tube – I asked them to put in some Coca-Cola, 
but was denied.

I had hoped to report more news, and better news, but every day can’t be great.  
This is a marathon and we have many more miles to go.  He is tough man and is 
hanging in there.  Thanks again for all your thoughts and prayers.


Tuesday, September 19, 8:00pm
Coach Arce has surpassed the 72-hour mark and as a friend said…. he is now out of the 
deep, dark woods. He now needs to keep moving toward the clearing and today was 
a step in the right direction.  He breathed without the assistance of the ventilator 
for 4 hours! A huge 
PR!!!  Good news, yes. 

Not so good news is that the breathing tube is still in.  Since he has broken ribs, 
there’s going to be a lot of pain while breathing.  The ICU doctors and the pain 
management doctors are working together to figure out best route to go.  An 
epidural is ideal, but since he takes a blood thinner, the risk of bleeding in the 
spinal cord also carries the risk of paralysis.  They considered surgically inserting
 a metal plate to prevent movement of ribs, but he has too many broken ribs (8)
 for that to work.  In the meantime, they will continue with his current pain 
management, keep doing sessions of unassisted breathing and when ICU doctors 
he’s strong enough to handle the pain they will remove the tube. 
Thank you for all your thoughts and prayers.  It is much appreciated.

Monday, September 18, 4:30pm



Not so good news is that the breathing tube is still in.  Since he has broken ribs, there’s going to be a lot of pain while breathing.  The ICU doctors and the pain management doctors are working together to figure out best route to go.  An epidural is ideal, but since


he takes a blood thinner, the risk of bleeding in the spinal cord also carries the


risk of paralysis.  They considered surgically inserting a metal plate to prevent movement of ribs, but he has too many broken ribs (8) for that to work.  In the meantime,


they will continue with his current pain management, keep doing sessions of


unassisted breathing and when ICU doctors think he’s strong enough to handle the pain they will remove the tube. 

Thank you for all your thoughts and prayers.  It is much appreciated.

Monday, September 18, 4:30pm
Coach Arce had an “uneventful” overnight and that is good.  The head injury


has not negatively progressed or as his

Sunday, September 17, noon
Coach Arce remains in the hospital and will be for at least the next week. The

main issue at this point is to make sure his brain injury does not progress and the last 24 hours have been good in that regard. If we get to 48 hours that will be major and 72 hours will be even better.. Another CT scan was done this morning and we are waiting on official results but the good news is that no progression in the injury was noted. They continually monitor pressure inside the head and that remains normal. He remains sedated to help his recovery but bring the medication down to do a periodic simple neurological exam and those have also been good. He is able to squeeze hands when asked, etc.

He does have other injures and those are being addressed. A bit of good news in that the fracture in hip is minor and he will not need surgery. He did have a collapsed lung (happened overnight) but they have inserted tube and the procedure went well and is not a current problem.

He remains in ICU and visitation is limited to immediate family members. Thank you for your understanding with that. I'll keep you updated as best I can.



Not so good news is that the breathing tube is still in.  Since he has broken ribs, there’s going to be a lot of pain while breathing.  The ICU doctors and the pain management doctors are working together to figure out best route to go.  An epidural is ideal, but since he takes a blood thinner, the risk of bleeding in the spinal cord also carries the risk of paralysis.  They considered surgically inserting a metal plate to prevent movement of ribs, but he has too many broken ribs (8) for that to work.  In the meantime, they will continue with his current pain management, keep doing sessions of unassisted breathing and when ICU doctors think he’s strong enough to handle the pain they will remove the tube. 
Thank you for all your thoughts and prayers.  It is much appreciated.

Monday, September 18, 4:30pm
Coach Arce had an “uneventful” overnight and that is good.  The head injury has not negatively progressed or as his neurologist stated …“the bad things we could have expected, did not occur”.  The pressure inside the brain has remained at a normal level for a good length of time and therefore the monitor inside the brain was removed this afternoon.  He has now passed the 24-hour mark; and at 7:50am tomorrow, it will be 72 hours.  At that time, we are hopeful that we are “out of the woods” or at least on the right path as far as the head injury is concerned. 

His next “step” is to get the breathing tube removed so that he can breathe on his own and begin talking.  The tube was originally placed there as prevention in case the head injury became more serious.  Also breathing on his own will be painful due to his broken ribs.  Yesterday was his first “weaning off” session.    He is taken off sedation, then breathing assistance from the ventilator is gradually removed – the session is stopped if blood pressure, heart rate, etc. gets too high.  Yesterday he went 10 minutes and this morning, a big PR of 41 minutes.  The goal is 60 minutes and then the breathing tube should be removed. 

Since he remains in ICU, visitation is still limited to immediate family members.  Thank you for all support with emails and texts – it is truly appreciated. 
     

Sunday, September 17, noon

Coach Arce remains in the hospital and will be for at least the next week. The main issue at this point is to make sure his brain injury does not progress and the last 24 hours have been good in that regard. If we get to 48 hours that will be major and 72 hours will be even better.. Another CT scan was done this morning and we are waiting on official results but the good news is that no progression in the injury was noted. They continually monitor pressure inside the head and that remains normal. He remains sedated to help his recovery but bring the medication down to do a periodic simple neurological exam and those have also been good. He is able to squeeze hands when asked, etc.

He does have other injures and those are being addressed. A bit of good news in that the fracture in hip is minor and he will not need surgery. He did have a collapsed lung (happened overnight) but they have inserted tube and the procedure went well and is not a current problem.

He remains in ICU and visitation is limited to immediate family members. Thank you for your understanding with that. I'll keep you updated as best I can.

Sunday, September 17, 2017

V 7 N. 63 Findlay U. Coach Mark Arce Seriously Injured on Way to XC Meet

Saturday September 16, 2017
Mark Arce


 Mark Arce, University of Findlay Cross Country and Track Coach was seriously injured while riding his bicycle from Findlay, OH to Tiffin, OH, a distance of about 25 miles,  for his team's cross country meet on Saturday morning.  Although things seem to be stabilizing regarding his head injury, doctors are still waiting for another 24 hours to determine the long term effects of that injury.  He also has multiple other injuries from which he will need to recover.  Our thoughts and prayers go out to Mark and his family while he is recovering from this difficult time.

Sportsmanship at NCAA Meet  Earlier this year, Mark brought this story to our attention.

Ironically Mark was a distance runner at Indiana University and teammate of Steve Heidenreich whose career was ended after being struck by a car while training on the roads.

Below is Mark's biography as posted on the Findlay U. website.

Marc Arce
Marc Arce
Title:Head Coach




Head coach Marc Arce is entering his 26th campaign as the head men's and women's track and field coach during the 2013-14 season.  Under his guidance and leadership, the program has developed into one of the elite in the nation.
In 2012-13, Arce coached Jessica Rowland to a national championship during the outdoor season in the hammer throw and saw Derrick Vicars earned Midwest Field Athlete of the Year honors during the outdoor campaign. 
During the 2011-12 campaign, Arce was honored by being named the NCAA Division II Midwest Coach of the Year as well as the GLIAC Indoor Men's Track Coach of the Year.  During his watch, Raven Clay (60-meter hurdles), Shane Shockey (pole vault) and Derrick Vicars (shot put) each won national titles for Findlay. 
Arce led the Oilers to a fourth place finish at the NCAA Division II Indoor Championship on the men's side and placed tenth with the women.  During the outdoor season, the men placed seventh while the women came in 13th.
In 2009-10, Arce saw Derrick Vicars win a national championship in the discus at the 2010 NCAA Division II Outdoor Meet and the men's team collected 13 all-Americans during the indoor and outdoor campaigns.  The women's team racked up four all-American awards in 2009-10 as well.
In 2007-08, the women's outdoor team had one of their best seasons ever as they finished 14th at the NCAA Division II National Championship behind two national championship performances by Kirby Blackley. She won titles in the long jump and 100 meter hurdles as well as being rewarded as the NCAA Division II Athlete of the Year.
The women's team also placed third at the GLIAC indoor and outdoor championships as Arce was voted the Coach of the Year in the winter.
Arce, who coached the Oilers men's and women's cross country teams for 25 years until stepping down in 2013, saw his women's cross country team plac second at the 2006 GLIAC Championship and third at regionals to advance to the national championships for the first time in school history. The women went on to take 18th at nationals in their first appearance.
Arce has been named the GLIAC coach of the year six times during his career, during the 1999, 2004 and 2006 (outdoor track/women's cross country) seasons as well as the 2007 indoor women's track and 2012 indoor men's track seasons. He was also named MOC coach of the year for the women in 1995 and 1997 and for the men in 1996. Going along with his success, Arce received NAIA District 22 coach of the year honors for women's cross country (1990 and 1991), women's track and field (1991, 1992, 1993 and 1994), and men's track and field (1992 and 1994).
Since his arrival at Findlay, Arce's athletes have won 132 GLIAC championships, 66 MOC championships and 66 NAIA District 22 championships. His athletes have also accumulated 15 national championships.
Overall, Arce has seen 118 athletes named all-American in NCAA competition and 145 more in NAIA competition.
Administratively, Arce was the MOC chairman for track and field and has also chaired the NAIA National Rating Committee for Women's Cross Country (1992), and has served as the NAIA District 22 chairman for cross country (1990-92) and track and field (1990-92, 1993-94).
Arce, a native of Valley Stream, New York, had a very distinguished career at Valley Stream Central High School on Long Island, New York. Arce's later running accomplishments include completing both the New York and Boston Marathons in 2:38 and 2:47 respectively.
He received his bachelor's degree from Indiana University in physical education, while participating in track and field. He later went on to earn a master's degree from Indiana State University.
Arce started his coaching career in the Indiana high school ranks. In his nine years of coaching at the high school level, his teams were 107-32 in dual meet competitions.
He is a member of USA Track and Field, the governing body of track and field in the United States and the United States Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association (USTFCCCA). He has also been a guest speaker at numerous track association conventions.

Thursday, September 7, 2017

V 7 N. 62 He works hard for the money - Larry Jessee

Larry Jessee

Larry Jessee, a Miamisburg, Ohio native has led an interesting and varied  path in the pole vaulting world that would fill several books and might have made a great reality show.  Once in awhile a new story about Larry pops up from a source.  Phil Scott who knew Larry quite well, comes up with something every now and then.  Third hand knowledge tells me that Larry set up a runway on his driveway and a pit in the back yard of his residence in Miamisburg to train, coach, and encourage young vaulters back in the 1970s.  Even made some world record attempts in the yard.  Phil claims one evening of coaching added two feet to his PR when he was a young and aspiring decathlete.

This story about  Larry is documented in the El Paso, TX newpaper where Larry now makes his home.  It goes back to when Larry won a $50,000 bet (with Lloyd's of London) that he could set a Masters WR in the pole vault.  I guess betting is an accurate way of describing a relationship with an  insurance company.  In this case Larry and his backers put up almost $4,000 to 'bet' that he could break the record.  Turns out he had done the same thing earlier in the year and won $30,000.

Here is Larry's bio from the UTEP Hall of Fame page.

LARRY JESSEE
Men's Track & Field (1974-75)
A three-time All-American who was a member of three NCAA championship teams, Larry Jessee was a standout performer with the men's track & field team from 1974-75. The 1974 NCAA indoor pole vault champion still owns the UTEP school record for the event at 18'. He became the eighth man in history to clear that height. Jessee had a decorated career following his time with the Miners, going on to compete with the United States National Team eight times. He was the 1977 and '78 USA Indoor Champion and became the American record holder in 1982 when he cleared 18-8. In his master's career, he held six world records from 1992-96. Jessee became the first and only man older than 40 to vault 18'. Jessee also served as an assistant coach with the Miners, directing four WAC Champions and three All-Americans. He has been inducted into the El Paso, UTEP Track & Field and Ohio Track & Field Halls of Fame.

  Here's the Masters WR  story via the El Paso Times  October 16, 1994




Considering that this year's world championships in London paid  $60,000 for a win and $100,000 for a WR, Larry was doing very well 23 years ago.  Putting those dollars into today's dollars, he may even have exceeded today's payout.  According to historic inflation tables,  $50,000 in 1994 would now be  $82,586 today.

This story makes me fantasize that if we are looking for ways to build spectator interest in the sport, a new approach might be that a meet be held where athletes compete against Lloyds of London putting up money that they can make a certain height, distance or time.    In the old days the Aussies had 'professional' athletes running for money, handicapping races, and taking bets in the stands.  Sports like pro football draw tremendous followings not only because people like the game, but also because many of them are playing fantasy leagues and betting heavily on point spreads, or in office pools.  Larry has shown that he could make a decent living out of the sport way back in 1994. Frankly, I would never get into a card game with Larry.

Monday, September 4, 2017

V 7 N. 61 More Old Track Photos 1962


Continuing with photos from the Track and Field Annual Newsletter 1962

Roger Sayers, U. of Omaha defeating Bob Hayes.   Roger is Gayle Sayers lesser known brother.


Gary Gubner

Dave Maggard

Billy Joe

Mel Renfro and Jerry Tarr

Keith Forman, Archie San Romani Jr., Dyrol Burleson, and Vic Reeve

Keith Forman

A young Dave Archibald

Roger Olson NCAA HJ champion

John McGrath












Detroit High Schooler Henry Carr, Olympic Champion to be








Thursday, August 31, 2017

V 7 N. 60 Some Old Photos #1

These pictures, courtesy of Pete Brown, came our way through the annals of Track and Field News in the form of an annual newsletter they would send out probably to subscribers.  The first set is from 1962.  Because there are so many of them we will have to show these in several postings.




Ed Red used to be a Track Trivia subject.  Who has the shortest name in Track?