Monday, July 24, 2017

V 7 N. 47 Ted Haydon's Alibi Check List

Two posts the same day?  Why not.  This came from Ned Price, former U. of Chicago Track Club Member with Coach Ted Haydon's list of excuses for not running well.  Here it is on the original mimeographed paper.  




Ned claims he got beat by a junior high school kid but the kid went on to be a state champ in Indiana.  So that's his excuse.

    I know this is a true storyline, but it’s a riot.   But Ted was a track guy and not a recreational runner.    Sometimes even runners world will put in a check list like this for the ave runner.  Are you kidding me.    for us it’s not that critical.  I think.   The running life is the good life.  but to a point.  Mike W.

George,
That's a pretty good list. I think I've heard at least half of them from runners (many from Barry Brown).
Bruce

this is a handy list.  where was it when i needed it??  Richard T.



Dear George:
Ted's list was invaluable.
You do know, I'm sure, that you are posting this material to the very few people in this world who know what a "jock strap" is.
Take care,
Tom


Dear George:
I saw Ned's comment and he probably was right.  Hal was/is adept at such things.
I remember seeing that list and thinking it was typical Haydon.  He may not have been the most technically competent coach but he had a way of dealing with his runners that kept them enthused, eager to keep at it and enjoying track and field.  As I recall, there weren't many "swelled heads" around Ted and his ability to prick any ego.
Keep up the good work.
Take care,
Tom

Tom,
That item used to be almost universal in men's sport, and now they are only in museums.
Well, not museums, but somewhere.  You don't even see them in estate sales.  Ned mentioned in his 'comment' that Hal Higdon used the snowblindness excuse.  I think hockey still uses them.  George


BTW I believe it was Hal Higdon who used snow blindedness. There was a race where snow obscured the course markings and some people ran one 
part of the course clockwise and others counterclockwise and met each other going opposite directions.  Ned




1 comment:

Ned Price said...

BTW I believe it was Hal Higdon who used snow blindedness. There was a race where snow obscured the course markings and some people ran one
part of the course clockwise and others counterclockwise and met each other going opposite directions.